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Comments

HanoiMark

Damn. That looks good. They are imported to Canada and sold in our Chinatowns but cost about a dollar for about two measly orbs. I can only afford to buy a small bag about once a summer here and they don't look all silky white like that! And then it's practically a buck per lousy dried out passion fruit (chanh leo) here. Grrr.

Preya

Qua mang cut. Possibly one of my favorite fruits (and I'm quite the fruitophile); unfortunately, the only specimen I've seen here was blackened and shriveled on the outside and equally dessicated on the inside. Enjoy!

Steamy Kitchen

Hey- I just found you via Noodlepie's site...I love your photography and recipes. No mangosteen here
:-(

jesse

oh sticky! you are you missing the gold gold gold part about the 'steen!!

Look on the bottom of your next fruit. There is what looks like a carved symbol on the bottom. Now the fruits can have different numbers of segments inside, and the good lord knows we only want lots of little segments without all that seed... So he put a picture on the bottom to show the number of segments!!! So genius.

bernard

you are a freaky lucky duck.. :D I love those fruits but never have a chance to taste it lately.

jenjen

I have never tried fresh mangosteens. I ahve only seen themin cans over here. I bet they taste wonderful fresh. Nice photo.

LK

Its faster to open if you take off the twig/stick that comes attached, leaving a round hole on top. Then, use palms to cup fruit and press gently till it splits open. Common Malaysian way. Hehe, using a knife...novel to us over here.

Mangosteen has cooling properties, contrasts with heatiness of Durian. Hence, they are sold side by side and often eaten together to balance the effect.

Sticky

Thanks all.
Jesse - you're right. I've often admired that little symbol which is like an ornate carving but had no idea that it indicated how many segments were inside.
LK - I'll try your opening technique for the next kilo. I'm not much of a fan of durian, I have to admit.

anh

Have you ever noticed that the number of wedges inside the fruit are the same as the number of "petals" at the bottom of the fruit?

You're so lucky to have these precious morsels so readily available to you =) I'm jealous, all we get over here is the frozen kind or in cans...sigh...

anh

Have you ever noticed that the number of wedges inside the fruit are the same as the number of "petals" at the bottom of the fruit?

You're so lucky to have these precious morsels so readily available to you =) I'm jealous, all we get over here is the frozen kind or in cans...sigh...

Josh

this was my favorite fruit (besides roseapple) when i was a student in thailand. i also used to think i needed a knife to open it, but one of my teachers showed me that if you just squeeze it, top to bottom, the sides will split right open without damaging the fruit and making it quite easy to eat.
here in alabama, we can't even get the smuggled fruit that appears in larger chinatowns. just frozen and canned ones. i have a can that i'm too afraid to open, because i was so terribly dissappointed by the frozen ones. i've heard rumors of cultivation underway in puerto rico and hawaii, but that it may be a few years before mangkhut begin to find their way into mainstream u.s. markets.
enjoy your wonderful good fortune to enjoy the "queen of fruits." (thurian, of course, is the stinky despot king)

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